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New Limited-Edition
Vogue T-Shirts

Three limited-edition T-shirts sporting iconic Vogue covers from
the twenties, forties, and fifties have been specially created to
celebrate the magazine’s 120th anniversary. Featuring Eduardo
Garcia Benito’s Art Deco flapper, Horst P. Horst’s bathing beauty
and Erwin Blumenfeld’s mid-century minimalism, this collection is
exclusively available online through the Condé Nast Collection.

Eduardo Garcia Benito’s Art Deco flapper
Vogue Cover – July 1926

This exuberant portrait appeared on the July 15, 1926 cover of Vogue. Eduardo Garcia
Benito depicts a well-dressed woman in a red cloche hat and drop earrings, with a fashion-
ably short haircut, holds a compact against a zigzagged background. ... learn more

Erwin Blumenfeld’s Mid-century Minimalism
Vogue Cover - January 1950

This surreal image by Erwin Blumenfeld depicting a single mascara'd eye and red lips
enchanted the world of fashion in the winter of 1950. This work illustrates a sharp contrast
which was becoming a popular element in the works of art of the 1950’s. ... learn more

Horst P. Horst’s Bathing Beauty
Vogue Cover – May 1941

Showing the creative genius of legendary art director Alex Liberman, the
fashion photographer Horst P. Horst was asked to shoot this model lying
on her back with her feet in the air, giving the illusion of balancing a large
red ball with her feet. She wears a white maillot and bathing cap in this
image from the May 15, 1941, cover of Vogue magazine. ... learn more

Eduardo Garcia Benito’s Art Deco flapper
Vogue Cover – July 1926

This exuberant portrait appeared on the July 15, 1926 cover of Vogue. Eduardo Garcia Benito depicts a well-dressed woman in a red cloche hat and drop earrings, with a fashionably short haircut, holds a compact against a zigzagged background.

(Spanish, 1891-1953) Born in Valladolid, Spain. A portrait painter, decorative artist and illustrator, his artwork graced the cover of Vogue over ninety times between 1921 and 1940. Benito used the pochoir technique. The technique, which results in remarkable depth of color, uses stencils cut from thin sheets of metal or thick paper in conjunction with hand coloration. It was popular in the late 19th and early 20th centuries for use on Art Deco-style fashion plates. Condé Nast asked Benito to redesign the look of his magazines in the late 1920s. In the spirit of modernism that permeated throughout the arts at the time, Benito instituted sans-serif typefaces and did away with the decorative borders, known as "cabbage" in the publishing business that surrounded photographs and illustrations. In 1929, Benito famously turned down an offer to become art director for all of the Nast titles. Instead, he packed up his belongings and went home to Spain to become a sheep farmer.

Horst P. Horst’s Bathing Beauty - Vogue Cover – May 1941

Showing the creative genius of legendary art director Alex Liberman, the fashion photographer Horst P. Horst was asked to shoot this model lying on her back with her feet in the air, giving the illusion of balancing a large red ball with her feet. She wears a white maillot and bathing cap in this image from the May 15, 1941, cover of Vogue magazine.

Horst is one of the most celebrated photographers in the history of Vogue magazine. Born Horst Paul Albert Bohrmann in Germany, he apprenticed in Paris under Le Corbusier and got his start at Vogue after meeting photographer Baron George Hoyningen-Huene and, later, Cecil Beaton. He worked at Vogue's Paris studio and then New York. A Horst photo is known for dramatic lighting and imaginative props and sets. His photographs of calmly elegant women are among the most recognizable fashion photographs in the world- his image of a model seen from behind with her Mainbocher corset unraveling is an icon of modern photography. In the 1940s he began shooting interiors for House & Garden as well as continuing his fashion work. The first exhibition of his work took place in Paris in 1932. Since then it has been featured in a number of exhibitions including large shows at the Sonnabend Gallery, the International Center of Photography, the Victoria & Albert Museum, Staley Wise Gallery, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and the National Portrait Gallery, London.

Erwin Blumenfeld’s Mid-century Minimalism - Vogue Cover - January 1950

This surreal image by Erwin Blumenfeld depicting a single mascara'd eye and red lips enchanted the world of fashion in the winter of 1950. This work illustrates a sharp contrast which was becoming a popular element in the works of art of the 1950's.

(German, 1897-1969) Born in Berlin, moved to Holland in 1918, and then immigrated to Paris in 1936. He was released from a German internment camp in 1941 and escaped to the US, becoming an American citizen in 1946. He began his professional career in Germany as an artist working in Dada-style collage. He briefly had a second career in the women's accessories business and then, in the 1930s, began taking photographs professionally. His first work for Vogue was published in 1938 and his relationship with the magazine continued through the 1950s. His fashion work was built on his bold use of color, while his portraits and nudes were shot in the more traditional black-and-white. Blumenfeld's style was greatly influenced by his art background. His best-known photographs, icons of 1950s fashion photography, are manipulated or contain collage-like elements. Two examples of his unique visual style were shot for the cover of American Vogue, one depicting an abstract close-up of Jean Patchett's eye and mouth, and a World War II-period cover of a woman silhouetted under a red cross. Blumenfeld was held in high renown during the 1940s and 50s; at the apex of his career, he was the highest-paid photographer in the world. There have been many major exhibitions of his work, including a 1986 show at the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris, and a 2006 show at The Hague Museum of Photography in The Netherlands.